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Tour 2006

Index

7 - Barking Creek and lower River Roding.

So it came to the last Thames creek (well any that a narrowboat should be expected to do), Barking Creek, the last great TNC unknown.
We planned to do this with the recent S.P.C.C. organised trip. The newly installed Barking Barrier now complicates this trip. This is another impounding weir with a radial gate to enable boat passage at and above a tidal level. This barrier has to be booked (this is NOT to be confused with the E.A. Flood Barrier at the entrance to Barking Creek.) Permission must also be sort for an over night stop against the many residential barges in the creek.
Dave Pearce the S.P.C.C. organiser had chosen a neaps tide to make the passage out from Bow Creek easier, as it would be against the flood tide. It was a perfect day for the passage, hardly any traffic about and the Thames like a millpond. Trevor Burridge whose father and grandfather were Thames tug captains and Ed Mortimer came along with Neil and stalwart TNC member Peter Wright, for the last great unknown.
It was a wide sweep to the entrance to the creek under the tall E.A. barrier. The many still busy wharves now mainly dealing with scrap metal. After a few meanders the navigation makes a right turn and the welcome sight of the open Barking Barrage met us.
I’m afraid we were a bit unsociable, but we had unfinished business a bit further up the River Roding, so we moored against the most upstream barge. Come the tide ebbing and the barrier shutting we crept up the River Roding on the impounded level. Passage through the old removed sluice was easy, but being right next to a large Tesco, we took very careful passage up.
After a couple of meanders we came across a blue footbridge, the nearest point to Neil’s old family house in East Ham, where he grew up. There was a reef of “something” below the bridge, but we ground over this in neutral. Above this footbridge is a slight pool, with a deeper section to the east bank, where a large storm drain enters. We managed to get to the next railway bridge, before grounding on the gravely bottom.
It was an easy reverse back to the footbridge and a powerless shaft wind, we recon a 70ft narrowboat could easily get round there, even at this “low” water level. Once back to the wharf we departed for the fleshpots of Barking for a celebratory drink


Nice telephoto shot of Peter Wright's - looking back at barrier, dome and Canary Wharf.


Escape from the prowling Woolwich Ferries.


A large swing downstream is needed to miss the upstream silt bar at the entrance to Barking Creek.


Lining up for the Barking Creek Flood Barrier.


Passing under the Barking Creek Flood Barrier.


Looking back at the Barking Creek Flood Barrier.


Barking Creek.


Looking back at the Barking Creek Flood Barrier.


Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


The A13 Bridge. Barking Creek.


The A13 Bridge. Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Barking Barrage. This half tide weir retains water in the navigable section up to Barking Wharf and the River Roding beyond. Barking Creek.


Barking Barrage. Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Looking back at the barrage. Barking Creek.


Barking Wharf. Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Barking Wharf. Barking Creek.


Barking Wharf. Barking Creek.


Barking Creek.


Barking Wharf. The River Roding is navigable beyond, via the bridge by the old mill. Barking Wharf. Barking Creek.


Barking Wharf. Barking Creek. 


We venture up the River Roding beyond Barking Wharf.


River Roding.


River Roding.


River Roding.


Barking Bridge, River Roding.


River Roding.


River Roding.


The potential winding point, spotted on an explo visit. River Roding.


River Roding.


After having glanced some rubbish under the footbridge we carry on up the River Roding.


River Roding.


Our limit of navigation , on a gravel shoal before the railway bridge. If use is made of Spring tides that crest the half tide Barking Barrage, then navigation for narrowboats is possible up to Little Ilford. River Roding.


Back at the "winding point".


Back at the "winding point".


Back at Barking Bridge, River Roding.


Earnest moored up at Barking Wharf.


Waiting for an exit through the Barking Barrage. This can be opened once the rising tide makes a level with the half tide weir, situated under the blue footbridge.


Waiting for Barking Barrage.


The barrage opens.


Passing through the Barking Barrage.


Looking back at the Barking Barrage.


Barking Creek.


Back at the entrance to Barking Creek.

TNC On Tour has ended! back to index.


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